Compound Personal Pronouns

The compound personal pronouns are made by adding the suffix -self or -selves to the appropriate form of the simple pronouns.

In the first and second persons, the suffix is added to the possessive case: myself, ourselves, yourself, yourselves. In the third person the suffix is added to the objective case: himself, herself, itself, themselves. Do not use the forms hisself and theirselves, for they are considered illiterate.

CASE

The case of the simple pronoun to which the suffix is added does not correspond to the case of the completed compound pronoun.

Although the suffix is added to the possessive case in the first and second persons, the resulting compound forms are not in the possessive case; they are in either the nominative or objective case, depending on their use in the sentence.

I myself will be held responsible (nominative—in apposition with the subject I).

I must have been kidding myself (objective—object of the verb).

Likewise, the third person forms, made from the objective case of the simple pronouns, are either nominative or objective, depending on their use in the sentence.

She herself will arrange the meeting (nominative—in apposition with the subject).

He made the desk for himself (objective—object of the preposition).

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